Insights: Human Resources

The June jobs report is out, and it shows that U.S. employers increased the pace of hiring, a sign of continued labor market growth.
U.S. companies didn’t need to see the statistics to know that, in today’s labor market, they must work harder than ever to retain their workers.
And since millennials will make up more than 75% of the workforce by 2030, finding a way to retain that generation of employees is a major concern.
So why write an article about giving your millennial employees negative feedback? Because believe it or not, they want it!

The annual performance review is an excruciating ritual that has been around for a really long time, but, in 2017, it’s just not cool anymore.
It is a 20th century model that just doesn’t work for the 21st century.  Managers see them as time consuming and not always reflecting employees’ real contributions. Employees, especially millennials, can find them demeaning and unfair.
But how can we provide the feedback that is essential to an employee’s growth without a review?   And how can management gather and organize information on employee performance to use in human resources decisions?  

It has become the norm for businesses to incorporate a virtual workforce into their operations.  
Whether a company has geographically dispersed offices, hires employees or freelancers in different cities or countries, or just offers local employees the flexibility to work from home, more and more of us are having to manage remote teams.  
Results of a Gallup survey published earlier this year showed that 43 percent of employed Americans spent at least some time working remotely in 2016.

The worldwide cyberattacks in the news lately have worried businesses and individuals alike.  
The ransomware attacks Petya and WannaCry have affected commercial businesses, governmental entities, and individuals by the thousands. But while the media focuses on these external attacks, internal network security threats remain one of the most common problems in  security management. 

The latest data out from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that the unemployment rate is at it’s lowest point since the recession and that the labor market is verging on full capacity.
While this is good news for the US economy, it means that you, as an employer, cannot afford to lose even one valuable employee.  Turnover is expensive.  

We are almost halfway through 2017, and, as expected, it is proving to be another challenging year for the HR professional.  
Unemployment continues to fall, shrinking the pool of talent. Social changes have had a profound effect on the new generation of workers and what they expect from their employer. And the recent political turnover is creating a whirlwind of changes in government regulation.
HR compliance is no longer a simple, straightforward process.  

It’s no surprise that the San Francisco transportation company is currently going through a much needed cultural change following a tough year in the press. But the questions on all our minds are, what will it take to really change Uber’s culture, and will Uber succeed?

When business owners and corporate leaders get together, it doesn’t take long for them to bring out the war stories of the difficulty of managing and retaining millennial employees.
We’ve all heard the complaints — They feel entitled to promotion regardless of the quality of their work.  They have no loyalty.  Their work ethic is sub par.  Blah.  Blah.  Blah.

As an HR professional, you know that successful employee onboarding is an essential part of any business strategy. It can improve retention rates and time-to-productivity for the organization.
It can make the difference between a happy and committed employee and one who feels no investment in the success of the business. 

 As a Human Resources professional, chances are you are drowning in the acronyms of workplace law and regulation.  ADA, COBRA, DOL, ERISA, HIPAA, FLSA, NRLA, etc. — They can add up to a big HEADACHE.